Introduction to Gender Studies (Syllabus)


Introduction to Gender Studies (SC-210)
T, TH 4:30pm – 5:45pm (Beatty Hall, 11)

Loyola University Maryland
Fall, 2012

Dr. Rebecca Dolinsky
Sociology Department Phone:  (410) 617-2742
Sociology Department Main Office:  Beatty Hall 314
Office Hours:  After our scheduled class meetings and by appointment
(I am additionally available via email once or twice daily)

Course Description

An interdisciplinary lens (using sociological, historical, queer, feminist, poststructural, anthropological, and cultural studies perspectives) is used to broadly understand the role that gender plays in society (the macro level) and our everyday lives (the micro level).  We will analyze and discuss gender as a historical, contextual, and intersectional concept that lies at the crossroads of race, class, sexuality, citizenship, age, size, and ability.  We will additionally situate gender within contemporary U.S. society—a cross-cultural and transnational landscape where identities are relational, institutional, and continually shifting social constructs.

Note:  Gender is not just a social concept; like any identity, it can also be very personal.  As we explore gender throughout this course, please be mindful of your peers’ multiple and intersecting race, class, gender, and sexual identities—particularly in relation to your own positionality.  I do encourage a critical lens in this course, which includes any challenges to the course material. 

Learning Goals and Expectations

At the completion of the course, students will be able to talk about and understand gender as a complex concept that is influenced and (re)shaped by history, the current moment, culture, and society.  Students will also be able to cite and describe important theories and methodologies that are used to analyze contemporary issues involving gender.  Furthermore, students will be able to write critically and analytically about gender as a socially diverse and continuously shifting concept.

Required Texts

-          Baca Zinn, Maxine, Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo, & Michael A. Messner. (2011). Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. New York: Oxford University Press.

-          24 supplemental readings available via Moodle and/or email

Moodle

Your syllabus and the 24 supplemental readings are posted on Moodle.  As we move forward in the semester, I’ll continue to post other important documents for this course (including course assignments).

Course Requirements and Assignments

  1. Participation and Attendance (10% of your final grade; 20 points possible) *
  2. Midterm Essay Exam:  Due October 11th (30% of your final grade; 60 points possible)
  3. News Analysis Papers:  (3 total; 30% of your final grade; 60 points possible)
  4. Final Paper:  December 13th (30% of your final grade; 60 points possible)

* You will earn “Participation and Attendance” points by attending class, being respectfully engaged in class (i.e., no texting on your cell phone, talking to your neighbors during class, or using your computer for anything other than taking notes), coming to class on time, remaining engaged with the course material (reading the course material ahead of time and bringing the material to class), and participating in discussions.  For further information, see my attendance policy below.

Weekly Schedule

Week 1

September 4thIntroduction to the Course

Zinn, Maxine Baca et al. (2011). Introduction. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, and M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 1-8). New York: Oxford University Press.

September 6thFeminist Legacies

Beauvoir, Simone de. (2003). The Second Sex, “Introduction.” In Feminist Theory Reader: Local and Global Perspectives (pp. 32-40). New York: Routledge. (supplemental reading)

The Combahee River Collective. (2003). A Black Feminist Statement. In Feminist Theory Reader: Local and Global Perspectives (pp. 164-171). New York: Routledge. (supplemental reading)

Anzaldúa, Gloria. (1999). La Conciencia de la Mestiza. In Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza (pp. 99-120). San Francisco: Aunt Lute Books. (supplemental reading)

Week 2

September 11thFeminist Legacies, cont.

Collins, Patricia Hill. (2010). Toward a New Vision: Race, Class, and Gender as Categories of Analysis and Connection. In Doing Gender Diversity: Readings in Theory and Real-World Experience (pp. 20-32). Boulder: Westview Press. (supplemental reading)

Zinn, Maxine Baca & Bonnie Thornton Dill. (2011). Theorizing Difference from Multiracial Feminism. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, and M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 19-25). New York: Oxford University Press.

Calasanti, Toni, Kathleen F. Slevin, & Neal King. (2011). Ageism and Feminism: From “Et Cetera” to Center. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 26-37). New York: Oxford University Press.

September 13thFeminist Legacies, cont.

Mohanty, Chandra Talpade. (1988). Under Western Eyes: Feminist Scholarship and Colonial Discourses. Feminist Review, 30 (Autumn), 61-88. (supplemental reading)

Mohanty, Chandra Talpade. (2003). “Under Western Eyes” Revisited: Feminist Solidarities through AntiCapitalist Struggles.” In Feminism without Borders: Decolonizing Theory, Practicing Solidarity (pp. 221-251).  Durham: Duke University Press. (supplemental reading, pp. 221-236 only)

Week 3

September 18thMasculinities

Gramsci, Antonio. 1971. The Intellectuals. In Selections from the Prison Notebooks, edited and translated by Q. Hoare and G. Nowell Smith (pp. 3-23). New York: International Publishers. (supplemental reading)

Halberstam, Judith. (1998). An Introduction to Female Masculinity: Masculinity without Men. In Female Masculinity (pp. 1-43). Durham: Duke University Press. (supplemental reading)

Ramirez, Hernan & Edward Flores. (2011). Latino Masculinities in the Post-9/11 Era. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 259-267). New York: Oxford University Press.

September 20thMasculinities, cont.

Foucault, Michel. (1977). Panopticsim. In Discipline & Punish: The Birth of the Prison (pp. 195-228). New York: Vintage Books. (supplemental reading)

Pascoe, C. J. (2011). “Dude, You’re a Fag”: Adolescent Masculinity and the Fag Discourse. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 464-475). New York: Oxford University Press.

Week 4

September 25thGender & Sports

Dworkin, Shari Lee & Faye Linda Wachs. (2004). The Morality/Manhood Paradox: Masculinity, Sport, and the Media. In Men’s Lives, sixth ed. (pp. 506-521). New York: Pearson. (supplemental reading)

Levy, Ariel. (2009). Either/Or: Sports, Sex, and the Case of Caster Semenya. The New Yorker (pp. 1-19). (supplemental reading)

Messner, Michael A. (2011). Becoming 100% Straight. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 197-202). New York: Oxford University Press.

September 27thGender & Sports/Masculinities, cont.

Video: Bully and/or Tough Guise

Week 5

October 2ndIdentity

Zinn et al. (2011). Perspectives on Sex, Gender, and Difference. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 11-12). New York: Oxford University Press.

McIntosh, Peggy. (2011). White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 235-238). New York: Oxford University Press.

Omi, Michael & Howard Winant. (2010). Racial Formations. In Race, Class, and Gender in the United States, sixth ed. (pp. 13-22). New York: Worth Publishers. (supplemental reading)

Butler, Judith. (1999). From Parody to Politics. In Gender Trouble (pp. 181-190). New York: Routledge. (supplemental reading)

October 4thIdentity, cont.

Altman, Dennis. (2011). The Globalization of Sexual Identities. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 186-196). New York: Oxford University Press.

Ghazal Read, Jen’Nan & John P. Bartkowski. (2011). To Veil or Not to Veil?: A Case Study of Identity Negotiation Among Muslim Women in Austin, Texas. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 245-258). New York: Oxford University Press.

Week 6

October 9thEmbodiment, Economic Mobility, & Consumption

Zinn et al. (2011). Bodies. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 65-66). New York: Oxford University Press.

Lamm, Nomy. (2011). It’s a Big Fat Revolution. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 67-71). New York: Oxford University Press.

Bettie, Julie. (2011). Girls, Race, and Identity: Border Work between Classes. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 455-463). New York: Oxford University Press.

Barber, Kristen. (2011). The Well-Coiffed Man: Class, Race, and Heterosexual Masculinity in the Hair Salon. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 87-99). New York: Oxford University Press.

October 11thEmbodiment, Economic Mobility, & Consumption/Identity, cont.   Midterms Due Today

Guest Speaker: Jennifer Tress, http://yourenotprettyenough.com/

Week 7

October 16thScientific Objectification and Control of Bodies

Allen, Garland E. (1997). The Social and Economic Origins of Genetic Determinism: A Case History of the American Eugenics Movement, 1900-1940 and its Lessons for Today. Gentica, 99, 77-88. (supplemental reading, pgs. 77-88)

Kessel, Michelle and Jessica Hopper. (2011). Victims Speak Out About North Carolina Sterilization Program, Which Targeted Women, Young Girls and Blacks. Rock Center (pp. 1-3). (supplemental reading).

Gann, Carrie. (2012). North Carolina Senate Denies Funds for Sterilization Victims. ABC News (pp. 1-2). (supplemental reading).
October 18thWork                

Zinn et al. (2011). Constructing Gender in the Workplace. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 371-372). New York: Oxford University Press.

Stone, Pamela. (2011). Getting to Equal: Progress, Pitfalls, and Policy Solutions on the Road to Gender Parity in the Workplace. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 324-329). New York: Oxford University Press.

Schilt, Kristen. (2011). Just One of the Guys? How Transmen Make Gender Visible at Work. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 386-402). New York: Oxford University Press.

Ehrenreich, Barbara & Arlie Russell Hochschild. (2011). Global Women. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 51-57). New York: Oxford University Press.

Week 8

October 23rdWork, cont.

Hochschild, Arlie Russell. (2003). Feeling Management: From Private to Commercial Uses. In The Managed Heart: Commercialization of Human Feeling (pp. 89-136). Berkeley: University of California Press. (supplemental reading)

Lois, Jennifer. (2001). Peaks and Valleys: The Gendered Emotional Culture of Edgework. Gender and Society, 15(3), 381-406. (supplemental reading)

October 25thWork, cont.

Wingfield, Adia Harvey. (2011). Racializing the Glass Escalator: Reconsidering Men’s Experiences with Women’s Work. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 373-385). New York: Oxford University Press.

Giuffre, Patti A. & Christine L. Williams. (2011). Boundary Lines: Labeling Sexual Harassment in Restaurants. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 403-417). New York: Oxford University Press.

Week 9

October 30thHigher Education – Scholarship & Campus Life

Mohanty, Chandra Talpade. (2011). Antiglobalization Pedagogies and Feminism. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 58-64). New York: Oxford University Press. (or 236-251 only in “Under Western Eyes’ Revisited: Feminist Solidarities through AntiCapitalist Struggles” – see September 13th reading list)

Ray, Rashawn & Jason A. Rosow. (2011). Getting Off and Getting Intimate: How Normative Institutional Arrangements Structure Black and White Fraternity Men’s Approaches toward Women. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 147-162). New York: Oxford University Press.

Yeung, King-To and Mindy Stombler. (2011). Gay and Greek: The Identity Paradox of Gay Fraternities. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 495-504). New York: Oxford University Press.

November 1stGender and Politics

Zinn et al. (2011). Change and Politics. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 493-494). New York: Oxford University Press.

Sklar, Kathryn Kish. (2011). A Women’s History Report Card on Hillary Rodham Clinton’s Presidential Primary Campaign, 2008. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 527-531). New York: Oxford University Press.

Feministing—Young Feminists Blogging, Organizing, Kicking Ass:  http://feministing.com/, Read posts connected to the following search phrases:  “Hillary Sexism Watch,” “Palin Sexism Watch,” “Bachmann Sexism Watch”

Week 10 

November 6thFamily

Zinn et al. (2011). Families. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 269-270). New York: Oxford University Press.

Espiritu, Yen Le. (2011). “Americans Have a Different Attitude: Family, Sexuality, and Gender in Filipina American Lives. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 203-211). New York: Oxford University Press.

Poisson, Jayme. (2011). Parents Keep Child’s Gender Secret. parentcentral.ca (pp. 1-7). (supplemental reading)  

Audio Clip: Tom Girls (This American Life: Somewhere Out There – Act Two:  Tom Girls)

November 8thFamily, cont.

Johansson, Thomas and Roger Klinth. (2011). Caring Fathers: The Ideology of Gender Equality and Masculine Positions. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 309-323). New York: Oxford University Press.

Hondagneu-Sotelo, Pierrette and Ernestine Avila. (2011). “I’m Here, but I’m There”: The Meanings of Latina Transnational Motherhood. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 294-308). New York: Oxford University Press.

Week 11

November 13thViolence

Horkheimer, Max. (1959). Authoritarianism and the Family. In The Family: Its Function and Destiny (pp. 381-398). New York: Harper. (supplemental reading)

Kimmel, Michael. (2011). A Tale of Two Terrorists Redux. The Society Pages (pp. 1-4). (supplemental reading) http://thesocietypages.org/socimages/2011/07/27/a-tale-of-two-terrorists-redux/

Hoffman, Claire. (2006). Joe Francis: “Baby, Give Me a Kiss.” The Man behind the “Girls Gone Wild” Soft-Porn Empire Lets Claire Hoffman into His World, for Better or Worse.  Los Angeles Times (pp. 1-12). (supplemental reading)

November 15thGender through Media & Politics

Videos: Media clips related to gender & the different themes of this course

Week 12

November 20thCatch-up Day

Office hours in class today

November 22ndThanksgiving Holiday (no class)

Week 13

November 27thGender through Media & Politics, cont.

Zinn et al. (2011). Popular Culture. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 477). New York: Oxford University Press.

Ransby, Barbara. (2011). Katrina, Black Women, and the Deadly Discourse of Black Poverty in America. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 125-130). New York: Oxford University Press.

Nagel, Joane and Lindsey Feitz. (2011). Deploying Race, Gender, Class, and Sexuality in the Iraq War. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 114-124). New York: Oxford University Press.
November 29th:  Gender through Media & Politics, cont.

Naaman, Dorit. (2011). Brides of Palestine/Angels of Death: Media, Gender, and Performance in the Case of Palestinian Female Suicide Bombers. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 131-144). New York: Oxford University Press.

Enloe, Cynthia. (2006). Wielding Masculinity Inside Abu Ghraib: Making Feminist Sense of an American Military Scandal. In Reconstructing Gender: A Multicultural Anthology, fourth ed. (pp. 514-523). Boston: McGraw Hill. (supplemental reading)

Week 14

December 4thGender through Media and Politics, cont.

Rutherford, Emily. (2011). Choose One. In M.B. Zinn, P. Hondagneu-Sotelo, & M.A. Messner (eds.), Gender Through the Prism of Difference, fourth ed. (pp. 483-485). New York: Oxford University Press.

Strate, Lance. (2004). Beer Commercials: A Manual on Masculinity. In Men’s Lives, Sixth Edition (pp. 533-542). New York: Pearson. (supplemental reading)

December 6thCourse Wrap-Up

Connecting the major concepts and theories from the course; final thoughts; questions/concerns about final paper.

Week 15

Our Final Exam is scheduled for Thursday, December 13th.  I will be in our classroom from 2:00pm to 4:00pm to collect final papers—please turn in your paper copy to me during this timeframe.

Other Important Course Information

Course Grading Scale


Grade
Percent
Point Range
Grade
Percent
Point Range
A
100-94%
200 - 188
C
76-74%
153  - 148
A-
93-90%
187 - 180
C-
73-70%
147 – 140
B+
89-87%
179 - 174
D+
69-67%
139  - 134
B
86-84%
173 - 168
D
66-64%
133 - 128
B-
83-80%
167 - 160
F
< 64%
127 - 0
C+
79-77%
159 - 154



*Attached to each assignment’s set of directions will be my grading rubric for that assignment.*

Note:  I will not grade on a curve for any assignment in this course.

News Analysis Papers(3) analyses at 20 points apiece; 30% of your final grade
Two pages; double-spaced; 11-12-pt font; Margins:  1” (top & bottom); 1.25” (left & right)

Over the course of the semester, you will be required to critically analyze (3) contemporary news articles and/or magazine/blog articles (data) using the course material.  Choose data that are relevant to a topic that can be easily connected to three or more of the course themes.  Select your data from two-three online newspapers/magazines/blogs (data sources) for consistency in reporting.  

You will also be presenting briefly on one of these papers.  Before your presentation, determine your general topic and at least one-two of your data sources (I will check in with all of you about this during the third week of the semester).  By mid-semester, you will be expected to have your topic and two-three data sources picked out.  For these papers, use course material that we have covered in class up to the time of the due dates.  These assignments must include:

1)      A URL of the article (http://www...)
2)      A short paper (two pages) that provides a synopsis of the news article or magazine/blog article and your critical analysis of the article using at least (2) sources from our course material.
3)      A brief presentation to the class, in which you will provide a summary of the article and a critical analysis of your data using the course material (for one of the three papers)

Provide at least two short quotes per source in these papers (four quotes total)—the quotes can be truncated or paraphrased, if done well and accurately.  I expect in-text citations for these papers, but a bibliography is not required.  Please see below for examples of in-text citations:

Dworkin and Wachs (2011) argue that “mediated sports,” like other social institutions, “function largely to naturalize values and points of view that are generally consistent with cultural hegemony and come to appear as ‘common sense’” (2011: 509).

- or -

“Mediated sports,” like other social institutions, “function largely to naturalize values and points of view that are generally consistent with cultural hegemony and come to appear as ‘common sense’” (Dworkin and Wachs 2011: 509).

By the end of the second week of this course, you will receive the due dates for your papers/presentations.  We will begin the presentations during the fourth Thursday of the semester and continue through the eleventh Thursday (with three-four students presenting most of these Thursdays).  I expect you to email each of these assignments to me and bring paper copies to class.

Midterm Essay Exam:  30% of your final grade; Due October 11th
Double-spaced; 11-12-pt font; Margins:  1” (top & bottom); 1.25” (left & right)

For your midterm grade, I will provide you with a take-home essay exam that is due back to me on October 11th in class (paper copy required).  The prompts for this exam will pertain to the first half of the semester.  Each student is to complete the exam individually; plagiarism will not be tolerated.  I will hand out the exam one week before the due date, on October 4th.

Final Paper:  30% of your final grade; Due December 13th
6-8 pages; double-spaced; 11-12-pt font; Margins:  1” (top & bottom); 1.25” (left & right)

For the final paper, you will be required to write a content analysis of (8) news articles and/or magazine/blog articles on any topic of your choosing, as long as the topic easily connects with three or more of the course themes.  By the end of the semester, you will have already critically analyzed (3) of these articles; therefore, you will need (5) more articles for this final paper.  For your data sources, choose two-three online newspapers/blogs for consistency in reporting.  Well in advance of the end of this semester, we will discuss what it means to write a content analysis paper.  Generally, you will be looking for themes throughout the articles that answer a research question. 

For example, if you are interested in gendered and racial representations of popular LGBT musicians coming out through the media, then your final paper might connect the course themes of Gender through Media & Politics, Identity, and Embodiment, Economic Mobility, & Consumption, or Gender through Media & Politics, Identity, Feminist Legacies, and Masculinities, etc.  You would then look for discourse within the articles that answers a research question, such as:  “How do media help socially construct coming out stories for mainstream musicians?”  For the final paper, I expect (and hope) that you will reference the (3) short papers that you wrote for the News Analysis Papers, but I also expect you to describe the course material in richer detail, rather than just copying and pasting from the smaller papers for this larger assignment.  When you write the literature review (summary/synthesis of the course material) for this paper, also make sure to synthesize the course material and align the course themes that you are focusing on.  I will check in with each of you mid-semester about your topic, online data sources, and research question for this paper, and I will provide a more detailed set of directions well in advance of the due date.

I require proper in-text citations (see above) and a bibliography for this paper.  See our syllabus for examples of a proper bibliographic format.

Note:  If you would like additional guidance for the writing assignments, do not hesitate to talk with me during office hours or after class.  Please also consider reaching out to The Writing Center on campus:  http://www.loyola.edu/writingcenter

Attendance Policy:  Attendance and participation = 10% of your final grade

Barring emergencies, debilitating illnesses, and participation in University activities at the request of university authorities, I expect you to attend this course on the days that it is scheduled.  I take attendance seriously—you will be earning “Participation and Attendance” points throughout the semester by engaging in this class.

You are allowed to miss up to two classes without penalty.  If you miss class, I will not email you the notes.  It is your responsibility to contact one of your peers for the notes and check Moodle for any missed assignments.

If you find yourself in extenuating circumstances (health-related, family emergency, etc.) that prevent you from attending class on a regular basis, please do not hesitate to talk with me about this.

Late Assignments:

I do accept late assignments, but you will receive a deduction of 5% of the assignment’s grade for each passing day.  Also, please bring paper copies of the assignments to class on the due dates--I will reduce papers by 1/2 point if I don't receive paper copies on the due dates.

Disabilities Statement

Students with disability needs can contact Loyola’s Disability Support Services at:

Marcia Wiedefeld, Director of Disabilities Support Services
(410) 617-2062
Newman Towers, West 107

If you have a disability that requires attention in class, during a writing assignment, or during an exam, please do not hesitate to be in touch with me so that we can set up appropriate arrangements.

“It is the policy and practice of Loyola College to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and state and local requirements regarding students with disabilities. Loyola College is an equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, color, religion, age, national or ethnic origin, veteran status, disability, or any other occupationally irrelevant criteria.  The College promotes affirmative action for minorities, women, individuals with disabilities, and veterans.”

Honor Code

Loyola University Maryland Honor Code Statement:
“The Honor Code states that all students of the Loyola community have been equally entrusted by their peers to conduct themselves honestly on all academic assignments. Our goal is to foster a trusting atmosphere that is ideal for learning. In order to achieve this goal, every student must be actively committed to this pursuit and its responsibilities, and is therefore called to be active in the governing of the community’s standards. Thus, all students have the right, as well as the duty, to expect honest work from their colleagues.  From this, we students will benefit and learn from the caring relationships that our community trustfully embodies. 

The students of this University understand that having collective and individual responsibility for the ethical welfare of their peers exemplifies a commitment to the community. Students who submit materials that are the products of their own mind demonstrate respect for themselves and the community in which they study. These students possess a strong sense of honor, reverence for truth, and a commitment to Jesuit education.  Accordingly, students found violating the Honor Code will be reprimanded appropriately in the belief that they will, with the support of their peers, learn from the mistake. This Code not only requires students to understand the ideals of Truth and Personal Care as the two strongest educational factors expressed in cura personalis, but also calls them to demonstrate a general concern for the welfare of their colleagues and the University.”

Please see the Community Standards Handbook for more information and clarification of honor code standards, types of violations, adjudication process, and sanctions:  http://www.loyola.edu/studentlife/display/documents/CommunityStandards1112.pdf